Crisis Management in the Airline Sector

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Crisis Management in the Airline Sector

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There is no dispute that the airline sector should be prepared for emergency and crisis events, given the remote, but plausible possibility that they may face a significant, negative event as a result of their business operations and services. However, too few are fully prepared or address the real requirements when it comes to both crisis leadership and crisis management.

Since September 2013, we have been collaborating with a business student, from the Lebanese International University, as she began the process of examining the real essence of crisis management, as it relates to the airline sector. Sara T. Joudy has produced remarkable work, with a combination of academic analysis and practical correlation between what works and what does not. We are proud to have collaborated with her in this process and hope you find her insights, analysis and handwork as helpful as we have.

Tony Ridley, CEO Intelligent Travel

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Abstract

No airline is ever immune to accidents. Some security incidents may be of severity or complexity that they cannot be effectively managed within normal operations. It is the airline’s responsibility to take precautionary actions and prearranged plans and rules in case of any emergency accidents, which may occur due to any reason. Therefore all the airlines must have emergency manuals, which are kept in all stations which they operate to/from and head quarter (crisis management center). Qualified staffs are trained to be familiar with the manual contents and updated accordingly, in order to be ready when it is required.

Since crisis management has been more important than before, and that all airline carriers must have emergency response plans to deal with public health emergencies, while a number of air carriers already have excellent emergency response plans in place, many do not.

This project has considered extant studies on crisis management, crisis communications and emergency response management, and examined how Gulf Air, the principal flag carrier of the Kingdom of Bahrain, counter and respond in order to protect the airline’s brand when confronted with a crisis. It has also analyzed how the airline company responds and helps survivors manage the media, and other issues on how the company reacts and performs during and after the crisis.

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By |2014-06-04T06:26:37+00:00June 2nd, 2014|Advice, Aviation, Business Travel, Crisis Management, Risk Assessments, Safety, Travel Management, Travel Risk Management, Travel Safety|Comments Off on Crisis Management in the Airline Sector

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